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Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to Management of Dimorphic Anemia by Repeated Blood Transfusions: A Case Report

A Sai Prathyusha, M Manasa Rekha

Abstract


Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, popularly known asPRES, is defined as a clinicoradiological syndrome which is characterized by symptoms such as headache, seizures, and altered consciousness and characterized by white matter vasogenic edema affecting the posterior occipital and parietal lobes of the brain .We report a 39-year-old woman who was treated by iron and blood transfusion for dimorphic anemia with a hemoglobin (Hb) level of 2 g/dl. Patient developed three episodes of seizures while the convulsions settled after infusion of phenytoin and midazolam. Her consciousness was immediately improved. There was no history of hypertension, convulsions, cardiovascular, renal or neurological diseases before transfusion. She developed typical manifestations of PRES six days after blood transfusion for severe anemia. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed T2and flair hyper intensities seen in the bilateral parietal occipital lobes which shows high Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) signal and multiple micro bleeds on susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI). The clinical features as well as MRI findings lead to diagnosis of PRES. Patient responded well to anticonvulsants prescribed by the physician and was discharged in a stable condition with no signs and symptoms after treatment.

 

Keywords: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, anemia, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), blood transfusion

Cite this Article

Prathyusha AS, Rekha MM. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to Management of Dimorphic Anemia by Repeated Blood Transfusions: A Case Report. Research & Reviews: Journal of Medicine. 2018; 8(2): 6–8p.


Keywords


Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, Anemia, MRI, blood transfusion.

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